Sweet Potato & Apple soup [Where I was]

This month marks the beginning of my 3rd year photographing weddings.  I still find it hard to believe.  Photography as a career path is nearly suicide for everyone who begins.  Somehow I've managed to be one of the lucky few.  I've not just survived, but have thrived.  Thanks to the joys of the internet and social media, quite a few of you have watched my work transition in a completely public way.  If you have not followed me for that long, allow me to explain to you where this whole thing started.

Four years ago, after my daughter was born, I became a stay-at-home parent.  I was doggedly tired.  Perpetually stinking of milk.  Sometimes out of my mind in euphoirc bliss.  Sometimes out of my mind in the regular bad sort of way.  Looking for creative outlet.  Something to do that didn't relate to washing diapers and fretting about why our child never, ever slept.  I started writing a food blog, which meant picking up a camera and teaching myself how to use it in order to photograph food.  Friends, it was really very humble.  I'm embarrassed that any of you ever looked at it.  But also, thank you, friends, for looking at it.  Thank you for being supportive of me, in my smallest, most modest of times.  

Food, for me, is really about intimacy and community.  Photography, for me, is really about the same thing.  Shauna Niequist, in her book Bread & Wine wrote:

The heart of hospitality is about creating space for someone to feel seen and heard and loved. It’s about declaring your table a safe zone, a place of warmth and nourishment.
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While she wrote that about the kind of hospitality and radical welcomeness she offers around a good meal, I think it applies pretty aptly to how I choose to apply my work as a photographer.   Feeding people is an act of love.  Photographing them is an act of love as well.  I choose to use my camera in such a way as to honor people and their lives and stories.  While I can't invite you all to be guests around my dinner table, I can leave you with a recipe.  It's a really simple, nourishing one that requires few ingredients.  We can reflect together on the ways little ideas grow into bigger things.  You're welcome here, just as imperfect as you are, with all the realness that makes you beautiful.  I hope that you feel seen and heard and loved.  

Sweet Potato & Apple Soup

This recipe was adapted from Real Simple.  Serve it hot with toasted walnuts and gorgonzola.  It will taste better when shared with a friend. 

 

  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • 3 medium sweet potatoes, peel and cut into 3/4 inch pieces
  • 2 apples, peeled and cut into 3/4 inch pieces
  • 2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
  • pinch of ground nutmeg
  • pinch of cinnamon
  1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, 6 to 8 minutes.
  2. Add the sweet potatoes, chopped apple, broth, nutmeg, cinnamon and 1½ cups water. Bring to simmer and cook, until the potatoes are tender, 12 to 15 minutes.
  3. Working in batches, transfer the mixture to a blender and puree until smooth, adding more water if necessary to reach the desired consistency. (If you have a fancy hand held immersion blender, you can use that too).